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Cheers to Congo! Meet Amani in L.A.

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Cheers to Congo Tickets



We’re excited to welcome Action Kivu’s inspiring leader Amani Matabaro to Los Angeles, for you to hear stories of how your generosity is generating hope & change in the lives of the women & kids in Congo!

RSVP today – a suggested donation of $40* for light bites + delicious wine from Bar Bandini + great conversation = a wonderful way to invest in the people of Congo!

WHEN: Saturday, May 27th ~ 3 to 5 pm

WHERE: Bar Bandini ~ 2150 Sunset Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90026

*If you’d like to donate a different amount, click on the donate button here and enter amount. In NOTE TO SELLER box, please write BANDINI and the number of tickets you would like.

 

Now You’re Speaking My Language: Connecting in Congo

Action Kivu’s Executive Director Rebecca Snavely recently returned from visiting Congo and all the programs our partners support. She writes here about the joy of finding shared understanding despite language barriers.)

I’d spent a half hour repeating the few words I knew in Swahili and Mashi, the local dialect: “Jambo!” to greet the girls and women in Action Kivu’s Sewing Workshop, and “Coco!” to thank them for allowing me to wander around their space, my face half hidden behind a camera, leaning in to take their photos.

They started to tease me, repeating Jambo! Coco! and laughing. I made a mental note to learn a few phrases in Swahili before my next trip to Congo. Koubde, a slight, older man who teaches embroidery and also repairs the pedal-powered sewing machines tinkered with one machine, tried to explain in French what he was doing. The words mechanic and machinist sound almost the same in English and French, and both our eyes lit up at finally understanding each other. The whole room broke out in joyful laughter.

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“Now you’re speaking my language” generally refers to being on the same page, having similar tastes in politics or movies. It reflects back on how it feels to understand someone, and more so, to be understood.

Interviewing the girls in Action Kivu’s Sewing Workshop, many of them had felt illiterate on their first day. They didn’t know anyone, and they didn’t speak the language of sewing – they didn’t know how to operate the pedal to make the machine run, or how to thread the needle, and they were afraid they would not be able to learn. Many of them had no classroom experience with a teacher: denied an education because of their gender and poverty, they were unaccustomed to the sewing trainer’s commanding tone.

Weeks passed, and the girls were all speaking the same language. It sounded like scissors slicing through fabric, needles piercing their path through the brightly colored cloth, laughter at stories shared over the rhythmic sound of their feet pressing the pedals. Stories that gave each girl the glimpse that they were not alone. Each story was unique, based on the life of each girl or woman, but the same themes ran through all. Denied an education because of extreme poverty. Raped and impregnated. Abandoned with a baby. Unsure how to obtain the good life – that of  being able to feed oneself and your child, and send them to school to stop this cycle. Speaking the same language, they were understood, and realized they were not alone.

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Growing Food and Community in Congo: We work faster together! We’re like family

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Mapendo and Faida share a plot of farmland in Action Kivu’s Organic Food for All Program.

“We work faster together! We’re like family.”

Learn more about Action Kivu’s work in growing food and community and combating malnutrition here.

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Sisterhood: Together We Feel Stronger [Congo]

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In Swahili, Mwamini means trusted, believing. “I live my name,” Mwamini says. “Without believing, it would have been impossible to graduate from the Sewing Workshop.”

Mwamini was forced to quit elementary school in the 4th grade, her family unable to afford school fees for their 6 children. “Sewing is a passion for me, I wanted to do it for a long time,” she says. “I feel proud and unique when I make fashion.”

Her father built the small structure for shade where Mwamini, Claudine, and Noella run their sewing co-op along the main road, running their business with the pedal-powered Singer machines they received when they graduated.

“I work in a co-op to promote unity and sisterhood. Together we feel stronger.”

Be the change that you wish to see in the world. (Gandhi)

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Start with Love: Sewing Student Iragi on Raising Up Good Leaders

Make a dress for me, Iragi asked her sister, Francine, who had just graduated from Action Kivu’s Sewing Workshop and set up her new Singer sewing machine in a room in their home.

Francine didn’t have time, so Iragi decided to join the Class of 2017, and make her own dresses. The first day she arrived at the Mumosho Community Center, she saw so many choices of skills to learn, she wasn’t sure what to choose.

“I started with basket making, but after mastering that in three months, I decided to challenge Francine. I wanted to become a better seamstress than my sister.”

Before starting the classes, Iragi explained, she knew some of the girls, but they had nothing in common, nothing to talk about. But now, we are more than family. We lean on each other.

Iragi didn’t hesitate to answer when asked what is unique about the Mumosho Community Center: We don’t have to pay! We learn for free. And then, at the end, you give us a kit to start our lives.

Iragi_quote_start_love_FEB2017With so many people living in extreme poverty, the chance at a free education and vocational training is critical. “The trainings are becoming a source of hope here,” Iragi says. “I will professionalize what I learned. I plan to graduate, and move somewhere else to start a business where there are more people working. But I will be smart about it, save money to buy equipment, to start a co-op.”

Iragi lights up when asked about her goals. Now 20, she wants to finish school: impregnated in her fourth year of secondary school, she had to quit. Her baby is 11 months old, and is looked after by other women at the Center while Iragi is in class. “I need to go back to school,” she says. Then there would be no limit to what she could do: “Imagine having a secondary diploma, a sewing co-op, and making baskets? I could be a teacher!”

“If girls and women are given the chance, given an education, we can change the future of Congo,” Iragi says. “We have to start within ourselves. If there is no love in ourselves and our families, the government, the leaders, will not love, as they are just people, raised up in our homes, our families.”

To invest in this work of equality and raising up a generation of peace-builders, click here.

Learn more:

About Congo

About Amani’s vision of a legacy of integrity

About Action Kivu’s Literacy Program

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